Gluten Free Matzo

by Danielle Leavitt

Matzo, pronounced “mat-zah,” is a special type of bread made with no yeast or leavening. It is the traditional bread of the Jewish holiday Passover, which will be celebrated this year on April 22nd, lasting for 8 days. The history of matzo goes back to when a Pharaoh governed Egypt and the Jewish people living in the land were his slaves. The Pharaoh decided at one point to exile the slaves. Story goes that they left to cross the Sinai desert to the land of Canaan in such haste, that they had no time for their bread to rise, and thus matzo was born! Flour is used as a main ingredient along with water, oil, and salt. Finally, there is now a gluten free counterpart to those that have this dietary restriction!

 

Ingredients in gluten free matzo are tapioca starch, water, potato starch, potato flakes, palm oil, natural vinegar, honey, egg yolks, and salt. These flat bread matzos can be used to make sandwiches, a matzo egg scramble, or just eaten plain. They are great tasting and only 125 calories per piece! A gluten free Passover is now possible!

 

matzah2

Hershey Kiss Acorn Treats

by Danielle Leavitt ’17

As always it’s a busy time in Harvard Yard. Tourists travel worldwide to see the infamous John Harvard statue, students study between classes in preparation for midterms, and photographers take pictures of the beautiful landscape and buildings at Harvard. But, mostly unnoticed, the busiest of all is the scampering squirrel who is gathering acorns and food for the upcoming winter. Especially now that winter looms and the bright colored chairs in Harvard Yard have been removed, the squirrel is even more noticeable as he stocks up on his impending feast for the next several months. The gluten free Hershey Kiss Acorn Treat is made in honor of the squirrel, in hopes that this winter, unlike the last, will be short and that the squirrel will have plenty of food to keep him satisfied. This recipe is very simple, but it is the perfect one-bite party snack that has an incredible chocolate peanut butter flavor.

Ingredients:

  1. Gluten free instant icing
  2. Gluten free mini vanilla wafers
  3. Hershey’s Kisses any flavor
  4. Reese’s Peanut Butter Chips

acorn3

Directions:

  1. Place mini vanilla wafers on a tray with the flat side of the cookie toward the top.

acorn22. Squeeze a small amount of icing onto the bottom of an unwrapped Hershey Kiss and place it onto the center of the cookie. Let sit for a few minutes to allow the icing to harden.

3. Place a small amount of icing onto the bottom of a Reese’s Piece and place onto center and top of the cookie.

acorn1This amazing acorn treat is a simple and tasty way to honor the squirrel and enjoy a great gluten free bite at the same time.
acorn4

HUDS Does Diwali

by Richa Chaturvedi ’18

When I was a kid, Diwali was all about the sweets. My sister and I would fill up on just about anything we could get our hands on. I would always go light on dinner because I about the delicious treats that awaited me.

Growing up, Diwali became more and more about the Indian dishes. There’s food as far as the eye can see. Diwali dinner lasts for hours – you just keep eating. The colorful food brightened up the table and made you feel warm inside.

Coming to Harvard, I’ve realized that Diwali is mostly about being with your family. It’s like any other holiday; the food brings people together, sitting and talking in one place. The rest of the world is paused.

image2

HUDS created that feeling for students missing home on Diwali this year. While nothing quite beats a home-cooked Indian meal, standing in the dining hall and smiling at familiar names of dishes created a place for me where time stood still. I told my friends what to get. I showed them which dishes tasted best together, but ended up mixing everything together because that’s what I always do. I was so excited to be able to share things from home with them. It felt like Diwali.

image1

Props to HUDS, because I was pretty impressed with the Indian selection tonight. The daal was on point and the basmati rice with peas was a nice touch. The vegetables in the coconut curry and idlis also deserve an honorable mention. It’s probably also important to note that my friends who have never had Indian food before ate it and liked it – I’m not saying that this was authentic or anything, but HUDS did good work as an introduction, a transition piece if you will. While I’ll end the night at brain break eating a classic PB&J, it was nice to be reminded of home. So thank you HUDS, you did good.

Why Did the Turkey Stop Eating? He Was Stuffed!

By Orlea Miller ‘16

Thanksgiving is easily a foodie’s favorite holiday of the year. While my day-to-day life revolves around the foods I’m eating for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, Thanksgiving is the one time of year when everyone else does the same. We begin looking into airline fares months ahead of time when making our holiday plans, and then spend at least a week or two carefully selecting Thanksgiving recipes and entering the grocery store madness just to eat together as a family.

My family sticks to the traditional foods for this annual event: turkey, stuffing, rolls, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, sweet potato casserole, and green beans (and a countless number of pies and other treats). Unfortunately, they don’t like straying from the recipes they’re used to either. However, after years of box-made stuffing, I decided to try out a new recipe for Thanksgiving this time around.

I found the recipe for “Save-the-Day Stuffing” online (a.k.a. homemade stuffing with a few healthy swaps) to lighten everyone’s plates this year. I used the typical veggies but included light bread and liquid egg substitute, and ended up with a pretty tasty addition to our household’s Thanksgiving repertoire.

Ingredients
(MAKES 5 SERVINGS)

6 slices light bread

1 cup chopped onion

1 cup chopped celery

1 cup chopped mushrooms

1 cup fat-free chicken broth, room temperature

1/4 cup fat-free liquid egg substitute

1 tbsp. light buttery spread

2 cloves garlic, finely chopped

salt, pepper, rosemary, thyme, to taste

1 oz dried cranberries (if desired)

Directions:

Leave bread uncovered at room temperature overnight. Otherwise, begin by lightly toasting bread.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Cut bread into 1/2-inch cubes. Spray a medium baking dish with nonstick spray, and place bread cubes evenly along the bottom of the dish.

1

Chop up the celery and onion to prepare it for the stuffing.

2

In a medium pot, combine broth, celery, and onion. Cook for 8 minutes over medium heat.

3

Remove pot from heat, and add mushrooms and garlic. Season mixture to taste with salt, pepper, rosemary and thyme. Let cool for several minutes.

Add egg substitute and butter to veggie/broth mixture and stir. Pour mixture into the baking pan, evenly covering bread cubes. Mix gently with a fork. Bread cubes should be moist, but not saturated (if necessary, add 1 – 2 tbsp. water, and then mix again).

If desired, throw in the dried cranberries to add a sweet kick to your stuffing!

Cover with foil, and cook dish in the oven for 20 minutes.

Remove foil, and fluff and rearrange stuffing. Return dish to oven (uncovered), and cook for an additional 15 minutes.

4

After comparing my homemade stuffing to the boxed one we have had at our Thanksgiving table in years past, I was impressed. This version had more flavor and texture, though I admittedly added in more chicken broth than the recipe called for after noticing it looked dry before putting it in the oven.

I found the stuffing recipe, along with quite a few other holiday dishes at www.hungry-girl.com, one of my go-to websites for healthy sides, entrees, and desserts that are just as tasty as the original version, yet far more nutritious and lower in calories and fat.