Spring Break Slushies

With only one week to go before spring break, I’m sure all of us (21+!) could really use a drink right now.  Or, you know, after we finish our midterms and papers.  Once you arrive at the end of the tunnel that is this Friday, you’ll have really earned it! If you’re looking to celebrate with something other than the classic Border strawberry margs, why not make your own alcoholic slushie?

Whether you are going somewhere tropical and warm, or staying here (which is also surprisingly pretty temperate), these easy-to-make, raspberry and gin slushies will leave you feeling refreshed and relaxed.

 

You’ll need:

  • A blender
  • 2 1/2 cups ice cube
  • 1 to 1 1/2 cup(s) sparkling water
  • 1/2 cup gin
  • 6 to 8 tablespoons granulated sugar (depending on the sweetness of your berries and your sweet tooth)
  • 1/4 cup lime juice
  • 10 ounces fresh raspberries, frozen

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Directions:

  1. In a blender, combine ice, sparkling water, gin, sugar, lime juice, and frozen raspberries.
  2. Blend until thick and smooth.
  3. Serve immediately.  Enjoy!

Note: this recipe makes 6 standard drinks and can easily be doubled (or tripled, depending on how rough your midterms were this week).

Recipe courtesy of Joy the Baker.

Mug Meals

by Audrey Thorne ’19

3

I have an excessive amount of mugs. I can’t help it. I love mugs. But it kind of seems like a waste to keep six mugs in my dorm room and only use one at a time for beverages, so I decided to challenge myself to make the most of my mugs by having a mug day. Four meals. Six mugs. A great alternative to real cooking.
5
#1
Ingredients:
Water
Directions:
1. Put water in cup
2. Hydrate while cooking more complex mug meals
6#2
Ingredients:
Milk
Water
Hot coco mix
Optional: Marshmallows
Directions:
1. Add milk and water
2. Microwave for 2 minutes
3. Add coco mix
4. Mix
5. Add marshmallows
15
#3
Ingredients:
2 eggs
1 tablespoon of milk
1 slice of American cheese
Directions:
1. Crack two eggs in a mug
2. Scramble eggs with fork
3. Add milk
4. Tear up slice of American cheese and add
5. Mix eggs, cheese, and milk
6. Microwave for 2 minutes
9
#4
Ingredients:
One mugs worth of water
Amount of microwavable ramen to taste
Ramen mix
Directions:
1. Fill mug with water
2. Microwave for 3 minutes
3. Add ramen seasoning
4. Mix
5. Add ramen noodles
1412
#5
Ingredients:
One pack of Kraft easy mac
Water
Optional: little bit of milk or butter
Directions:
1. Add macaroni to mug
2. Add water
3. Microwave for 3.5 minutes
4. Add cheese powder
5. Mix
6. Add milk or butter
78
#6
Ingredients:
1/3 box of brownie mix
1/5 cup oil
1 tablespoon of water
Optional: chocolate chips, 1 egg
Directions:
1. Add brownie mix, oil, water, an egg, and chocolate chips
2. Mix
3. Microwave for 3 minutes
1

The Struggles of Being a Foodie Who Can’t Cook

by Angela Yi ’19

I’m supposed to be working on my paper due tomorrow, but I turn on my phone and go on Facebook. As I scroll through my feed, the first thing I see is: 5 Make-Ahead Dinners That Will Make You A Champion At Life. Like all other freshmen, eating Annenberg food every day has become more than a little tiring. A small hope burgeons in my chest – maybe I’ll finally be able to eat something else? – and I click on the link.

But I read the first line of the recipe – “Heat olive oil in a large saucepan or skillet” – and the sensation of crushing disappointment hits. Heat? As in fire? As in one-of-my-biggest-phobias-in-the-world?

Picture 1
Ramen, AKA my final attempt at cooking

I love food. And I especially love good food. Alas, I can’t cook because 1. I’m deathly afraid of knives and fire, and 2. I gave up on the culinary arts after I caused a small fire while trying to make instant ramen. So recipes like 20 Fast Dinner Recipes or 27 Healthy Recipes You Can Make in Your Dorm Room are a bit…beyond my capabilities.

Picture 2
Tonight’s dinner at the Berg, featuring Beef Meatballs in Marinara Sauce, Spinach Ricotta Casserole, Steamed Green beans, Toasted Farro and Barley, and Pepper Pot Soup

Herein lies the problem: I love good food, but I can’t cook to save my life, and Annenberg food isn’t always fulfilling. Thankfully, my mom makes amazing food, so I survived my first 19 years of life. But unfortunately, sending over food from California even once a week, let alone every day, is a bit unrealistic. And eating takeout everyday is very tempting – if only I had a bottomless wallet.

Picture 3
A closeup of the Pepper Pot Soup

I thought about this long and hard before college started, and after hours of pondering, I finally came up with a solution: Join a food blog! Getting subsidized to eat awesome restaurant food as long as I write a review is an offer I absolutely cannot refuse.

Picture 4Picture 5

Possible future meals?

Thank you, Uncle Harvard.